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Dermatosis Papulosa Nigra

Treatment by Dr. Leonora Ogbeide, MD CCFP

Dermatosis Papulosa Nigra

Treatment
by Dr. Leonora Ogbeide

Dermatosis Papulosa Nigra (DPN) Treatment

IN

Milton & The Greater Toronto Area

Oftentimes, some individuals may choose to embrace their natural appearance, viewing DPN as a unique aspect of their identity. They may resist societal pressures to conform to conventional standards of beauty and see their DPN as a personal choice that empowers them.

However, people with Dermatosis Papulosa Nigra (DPN) can experience a range of emotions about the condition, and for some, DPN removal is a consideration. The appearance of the lesions, particularly on visible areas like the face and neck, can, for some, be a source of cosmetic concern. Cultural perceptions of beauty and skin aesthetics can influence their feelings, as acceptance of skin blemishes varies across different cultures.

The understanding that DPN often has a genetic component might lead individuals to feel a sense of inevitability about the condition, but treatment options are available.

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What is Dermatosis Papulosa Nigra?

Dermatosis Papulosa Nigra (DPN) is a benign skin condition characterized by small, dark brown to black papules that typically appear on the face, neck, chest, and back. These papules are usually smooth, dome-shaped, and vary in size, ranging from a pinhead to a few millimeters in diameter.

DPN is more commonly seen in individuals with darker skin types, such as people of African, Asian, or Hispanic descent. It is often considered a variant of seborrheic keratosis, another non-cancerous skin growth.

DPN on the cheek of Illustria client

What is Dermatosis Papulosa Nigra?

Dermatosis Papulosa Nigra (DPN) is a benign skin condition characterized by small, dark brown to black papules that typically appear on the face, neck, chest, and back. These papules are usually smooth, dome-shaped, and vary in size, ranging from a pinhead to a few millimeters in diameter.

DPN is more commonly seen in individuals with darker skin types, such as people of African, Asian, or Hispanic descent. It is often considered a variant of seborrheic keratosis, another non-cancerous skin growth.

DPN on the cheek of Illustria client

What is the cause of DPN?

Although the precise cause of Dermatosis Papulosa Nigra (DPN) is not clear, it is widely accepted to be a genetically predisposed hereditary condition. There is a significant familial tendency, which increases the likelihood that you may acquire DPN if you have a family history of the condition. People of African, Asian, or Hispanic heritage frequently get the illness, which may indicate a hereditary component.

Dermatosis Papulosa Nigra is thought to be a type of seborrheic keratosis, which is another typical benign skin development. The condition, known as seborrheic keratosis, is linked to genetic factors and typically runs in families.

DPN usually starts in adolescence and gets worse as people age. Due to the fact that the lesions frequently develop or enlarge during puberty or pregnancy, hormonal variables may have an impact on their course.

UV radiation is recognized to play a role in the development of a number of skin disorders, even though there is no concrete evidence connecting DPN to sun exposure. Avoiding too much sun exposure on the skin can help keep it healthy overall and avoid further skin problems.

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Who does typically DPN affect?

Dermatosis Papulosa Nigra (DPN) typically affects individuals with darker skin types, particularly those of African, Asian, or Hispanic descent. It is less common in individuals with lighter skin tones. DPN tends to emerge during adolescence and becomes more noticeable with age.

Key characteristics of individuals affected by DPN include:

  • Ethnicity: DPN is more prevalent in people with skin color. The condition is commonly seen in individuals of African, Asian, or Hispanic ancestry.
  • Age: DPN often starts to appear during adolescence, and the number of lesions tends to increase with age. While the lesions are generally benign, they become more noticeable over time.
  • Family History: There is a strong familial tendency for DPN. If a person has a family history of DPN, they are more likely to develop the condition themselves.
  • Gender: DPN does not show a significant gender bias, affecting both males and females.

It’s important to note that while DPN has a tendency to be more prevalent in certain ethnic groups, it can occur in individuals of any race or ethnicity.

Young woman inspects Dermatosis Papulosa Nigra on her face

Who does typically DPN affect?

Dermatosis Papulosa Nigra (DPN) typically affects individuals with darker skin types, particularly those of African, Asian, or Hispanic descent. It is less common in individuals with lighter skin tones. DPN tends to emerge during adolescence and becomes more noticeable with age.

Key characteristics of individuals affected by DPN include:

  • Ethnicity: DPN is more prevalent in people with skin color. The condition is commonly seen in individuals of African, Asian, or Hispanic ancestry.
  • Age: DPN often starts to appear during adolescence, and the number of lesions tends to increase with age. While the lesions are generally benign, they become more noticeable over time.
  • Family History: There is a strong familial tendency for DPN. If a person has a family history of DPN, they are more likely to develop the condition themselves.
  • Gender: DPN does not show a significant gender bias, affecting both males and females.

It’s important to note that while DPN has a tendency to be more prevalent in certain ethnic groups, it can occur in individuals of any race or ethnicity.

Young woman inspects Dermatosis Papulosa Nigra on her face

What can be done to treat DPN?

Dermatosis Papulosa Nigra (DPN) is a benign condition, and treatment is usually elective, often pursued for cosmetic reasons or if the lesions become bothersome or irritated. Some common treatment options for DPN are:

  • Cryotherapy: Cryotherapy involves freezing the lesions with liquid nitrogen. This method is often used for various skin growths, including DPN. It causes the lesions to fall off over time.
  • Laser Therapy: Laser treatment can be used to target and remove DPN. This method is often chosen for its precision and minimal scarring. Different types of lasers may be used depending on the characteristics of the lesions.
  • Excision: In some cases, Dr. Ogbeide may opt for surgical excision, which involves cutting out the lesions. This method may be preferred for larger or more raised lesions.

To learn more about DPN treatment options, book a consultation with Dr. Leonora Ogbeide. The choice of treatment depends on factors such as the size and location of the lesions, as well as the individual’s preferences and medical history. It’s important to note that while these treatments can effectively remove existing lesions, new ones may develop over time, especially if there is a genetic predisposition.

It’s also worth emphasizing that DPN is a benign condition and doesn’t pose any health risks. Individuals considering treatment should weigh the potential benefits against the risks and potential side effects of the chosen method. Additionally, individuals with DPN should protect their skin from excessive sun exposure and maintain good overall skin health.

Still Have Questions About Treating DPN?

Contact us at Illustria Medical Aesthetics in Milton

& The Greater Toronto Area in Ontoario.

Contact Us at Illustria Medical Aesthetics